Life in a Nazi Concentration Camp

From the Series Living History
Format Price Qty
$30.95
$35.95

Life for the inmates of Nazi leader Adolf Hitler's concentration camps was brutal, dangerous, and often pitiless, and yet, as if by a miracle, some of the prisoners survived to tell their harrowing tales. Living conditions, forced labor, punishment, and rituals of survival are among the topics discussed in this gripping social history.

Interest Level Grade 7 - Grade 12
Reading Level Grade 7
Copyright 2014
Genre Nonfiction
Publisher ReferencePoint Press
Series Living History
Language English
Number of Pages 96
ISBN 9781601525109, 9781601525116B
Title Format Reinforced book, Print + Ebook
Release Date 2014-08-01
Author Don Nardo
Dewey 940.53
 

Jewish Book World

The concentration camp experiences described here are drawn from original sources and those who lived them. The book opens with facing pages of fifteen boxed statements of pivotal points in the history of the Nazi Era from 1919 through 1943 and five photographs. The introduction provides the setting and progression of slander against the Jews, projecting Jews as the cause of all misfortunes fallen upon German citizens, who in turn swallowed Hitler’s lies and the official anti-Semitic propaganda. This resulted in Jews being sent to ghettos and concentration camps ranging from labor to death camps. The graphic photos in this portion show the shriveled, starved prisoners lying on the floor waiting to die, yet there were some who survived to testify against those who had tortured them. This book delivers informa­tion and discussions on a variety of topics ranging from deportation and arrival, through descriptions in separate chapters of hous­ing, food, living conditions, forced labor and exploitation of inmates, threats of punishment and death, and, finally, the miracles of survival and liberation. Not only are there photos and maps throughout, but also definitions of the terms used to describe words such as “latrine,” German words, and other words used in the context of this topic, as well as the insertion of personal narratives. There are no “code” words used to soften the facts and some of the photos are gruesomely graphic, particularly the one of piled up emaciated dead prisoners. Included are: Source Notes For Further Research, a lengthy Index and Picture Credits. This is a marvelous introduction to the study of the Holocaust for students ages 11 and up.

Library Media Connection

Gr. 9–12 Written by various well-known nonfiction authors, this series attempts to describe life during various periods of history, through the social history of the common man; merchant, farmer, artisan, and slave. Using letters, diaries, coins, paintings, and other items of the historical periods, the authors endeavor to reconstruct the daily struggles of the average person. Life in a Nazi Concentration Camp is the most wrenching. Each volume has a timeline of the subject covered. The books are replete with numerous sidebars and illustrations giving more information to the topic. Bibliography. Websites.

School Library Journal

Gr 8 Up–These volumes focus on the everyday lives of a variety of people, including different social and economic classes, women, children, and slaves and servants. The books describe how people were housed, where they worked, what they ate, and how they worshipped and learned. All are well written in clear, informative prose that draws on well-documented primary sources, which are quoted in the text and excerpted in sidebars. The titles are objective about the negative and positive parts of each culture. The average-quality maps, period reproductions, and photographs add little to the texts. More focused on ordinary people than the books in Lucent’s “The Way People Live” series, these titles will promote deeper understanding of societies and groups that, for better or worse, influenced world history. Solid choices for secondary collections.

Booklist

Like other titles in the Living History series, this study relies particularly on eyewitness accounts to portray daily conditions—in this case, horrors—during particular historic periods. After filling in the background on Hitler’s rise to power, Nardo incorporates carefully documented quotes from the memoirs of concentration camp survivors into his harrowing, fairly explicit account of how Jews and other “undesirables” were first segregated into ghettos and then transported, abused physically and psychologically, and worked to death and murdered in huge numbers. Lightening this dark picture somewhat, Nardo describes heroic instances of overt and covert resistance by prisoners and rescuers, such Oskar Schindler. Wartime and postwar photos illustrate this unflinching addition to the Holocaust shelves.

School Library Journal

Gr 8 Up These volumes focus on the everyday lives of a variety of people, including different social and economic classes, women, children, and slaves and servants. The books describe how people were housed, where they worked, what they ate, and how they worshipped and learned. All are well written in clear, informative prose that draws on well-documented primary sources, which are quoted in the text and excerpted in sidebars. The titles are objective about the negative and positive parts of each culture. The average-quality maps, period reproductions, and photographs add little to the texts. More focused on ordinary people than the books in Lucent’s “The Way People Live” series, these titles will promote deeper understanding of societies and groups that, for better or worse, influenced world history. Solid choices for secondary collections.

Author: Don Nardo

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